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Mary McConnell

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March 4, 2019 marked the one-year active surveillance follow up date for the very early stage breast cancer diagnosis that I was given in January 2018. Instead of proceeding with a lumpectomy and possible radiation (as was originally suggested by the first surgeon I was referred to) I chose to take a wait and see approach as there was not 100% certainty that what had been detected on my mammograms, ultrasounds and two biopsies was indeed something that needed to be treated immediately or even at...

Haiti is one of the poorest countries in the world. More than 6 million out of the 10.4 million Haitians (59%) are living below the national poverty line of CAD $3.16 per day and over 2.5 million (24%) are living below the national extreme poverty line of CAD $1.61 per day. (The World Bank April 2018)

Some other staggering statistics reveal the ongoing desperate state of the 12.9 million Haitians who are subject to impoverished living conditions. (World Food Programme & Restavek Freedom...

When I was first diagnosed with very early stage breast cancer I chose “active surveillance” instead of a lumpectomy as my treatment. I wanted to take a “wait and see” approach for the progression (if any) of the small group of malignant cells in my right breast … taking action as necessary, but not before.

The first surgeon I was referred to after the pathology reports from my two biopsies came back, said that surgery (with the possibility of radiation post surgery) was pretty much my only optio...

Every week, students at the Children’s Academy in Baocia, Haiti eagerly anticipate talking with their volunteer partner, known as their “Hangout Partner”, using an online video chat application. As participants in the Language Hangouts program, students are given the opportunity to practice their English-speaking skills through weekly 30-minute virtual conversations on one of the school’s laptop computers with a volunteer who connects from their home in Canada or the U.S. 

Haiti Partners, founded...

It is my belief that YES you should seek a second opinion, especially (as in my experience) something doesn't feel right about the news and options for treatment that you are being given.

Most women panic and want something done right away when they receive the frightening news that there are malignant cells in their breast. We can often be swayed by what the medical system has to say about what needs to be done to heal our bodies. Yet, more often than not, there is no need to rush into a decisio...

When I received the news that there was a "favoured low-grade neoplastic lesion" in my right breast I wasn't clear on what that was. What does "favoured" mean? That there "might be"? That there might NOT be? And what is a low-grade neoplastic lesion anyway? The pathology reports from the two biopsies that had followed several mammograms and ultrasounds, were confusing and full of contradictory and indecipherable information that left me feeling uneasy and with more questions than clarity....

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18 Month Follow Up - Cancer Cells REDUCED!!

September 23, 2019

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